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July 08, 2008

Comments

Foodie

And the Dutch and the Flemings and all!

Anita

And then there are the bBrits who see their language as different to what we speak...

KathyF

About that British T--I often tell my American friends that they aren't pronouncing their "t's" and they don't believe me, until I ask them what the name of that book by JK Rowling is...and they say "Harry Podd..oh, I get it".

But on the other hand, the British don't realize they aren't pronouncing their r's.

Foodie

John--"Of-ten" sounds terribly Brit--perhaps Kathy F, an ex-pat in Britain, can weigh in--though my near Philly-born husband also says it, sometimes...As for leaving out words, remember George H. W. Bush's style of speaking?
( At least he could string a sentence together.) I think he disliked pronouns, along with broccoli.

Yes, Kathy F--I do hear that more and more.People are so non personal these days, apparently.

John

A quirky pronunciation peeve of mine is how over the course of my lifetime, everyone has gradually started pronouncing the "t" in "often". I say it as "offen", which I think is correct (though admittedly, a quick look in my 20-yr-old "Webster's" has "of't'n" as the runner-up pronunciation after "of'n"). A quirk I LOVE, and got to know well from working around a few farming folks from the Pittsburgh area, is the Pennsylvania trick of dropping "to be" out of sentences: "The carrots need washed" as opposed to "The carrots need to be washed".

KathyF

I haven't noticed those particular misuses, but have noticed others, namely the use of 'that' to refer to a person. "The person that arrives first..." instead of 'who'.


Foodie

"Where is it?"
Says exactly what you mean. "Where is the Prosecco, dear? It was on the table but I think you finished it off."

"Where is it AT?" adds an unnecessary word. But, to be fair, the "at" may be added generally when one is seeking the location of a street or the venue of an Obama rally or such.

Still, not needed, that "at."

Rose

--"Where is it at?" Instead of what? The rest I got. So please explain to a "forriner". To me the --"Where is it at?" sounds like living language. But then, I have just been to NM.

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